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Week 3

Hi everyone and welcome back after Easter!

It's time to get back into our home learning and our maths work.  Just a reminder then of some of the things we should be doing everyday to keep practising our numbers to 50.  Hopefully we will be back in school soon and can move on to numbers to 100 but if your child is ready, you can do the same tasks below for all the numbers to 100.

  • Counting up and down in 1s from numbers within 50.
  • Counting up and down in 2s, 5s and 10s from numbers within 50.
  • Playing 'Fastest Finger' using the provided hundred square to quickly identify numbers to 50.  All you need to do is say a number and the child finds and points to it on the 100 square as fast as possible.
  • Say numbers up to 50 for your child to write on their laminated whiteboard or exercise book provided in your pack.
  • Practice the appropriate Gem maths level.  Children can record answers on their whiteboards or in their exercise books.  The full-size Gem Maths sheets have now been uploaded to the Gem Maths page on this website. 

 

Once you have done some number work, check out the daily tasks below.  Don't forget to send me pictures of your amazing maths work.

 

Monday

 

This week we are going to revisit some of the work we did on 2D shapes.

 

Can you name all of the shapes below?

What do you notice about all of these shapes?

 

How are they the same?  How are they different?

 

I would like to write a sentence about each shape describing its properties.  For example:

 

The circle has one curved side and no corners.

 

Think about the number of sides and corners and the relative lengths of the sides.

 

Once you have done this, using a ruler where necessary, have a go at drawing some squares, rectangles and triangles.  Drawing a circle is very difficult so see if you can find anything circular to draw around.

 

Send us some pictures of your shapes you have drawn and your sentences that go with them.

Tuesday

 

Today we are carrying on with shape.  Yesterday we were thinking about circles, triangles, rectangles and squares and you had to write some sentences to describe them.

 

Some of the thing you should have noticed were:

  • Circles have one curved side.
  • Squares have four corners and four straight sides that are all the same length.
  • Rectangles have four corners and four straight sides. Opposite sides are the same length but adjacent sides are different lengths.
  • Triangles have three corners and three straight sides.

 

Do all of these shapes always look the same?

 

The answer is no.  Squares and circles always keep the same shape but can vary in size.  Rectangles and triangles can look very different.  Look at the examples below.

Your job today is try and spot as many shapes as you can around your home.  Which shape is the most common?  Which is the least common?  Can you find any strange looking triangles or rectangles.  Complete a tally chart like the one below.

This is what i spotted in my kitchen and I am sure I missed some. See what you can find yourselves.

By far the most common shape was the rectangle.  What is the most common in your home?  Send us pictures of your tables and any interesting shapes you find.

Wednesday

 

Today we are going to do some problem solving based on shapes.  Have a go at finding the answers to the questions below.  Record the answers in your workbooks.  Don't forget to be a maths detective and look for evidence to explain how you knew.

Reasoning and Problem Solving

Thursday

 

It is our last day thinking about 2D shapes so we ae going to do a little more problem solving.

 

Have a go at the following questions. I have also attached them as document so you print it off if that easier for you.

Shape Problems

Friday

 

Friday is Fluency Friday.  You need to do your Gem Maths test to see if you can move up a level.

 

But first do your daily tasks to practise numbers to 50:

  • Counting up and down in 1s, 2s 5s and 10s from numbers within 50.
  • Playing 'Fastest Finger' using the provided hundred square to quickly identify numbers to 50.  All you need to do is say a number and the child finds and points to it on the 100 square as fast as possible.
  • Say numbers up to 50 for your child to write on their laminated whiteboard or exercise book provided in your pack.

 

Then practice some addition and subtraction of numbers to 20 to get ready for your test.

 

Next do your Gem maths test (children should know what level they are on).  Get a grown up to write the questions out for you then you have three minutes to answer them all.  Remember, you are not allowed to use anything to help you during the test.

 

Let us know what level you attempted and what score you got.  Did you get 19 or 20?  If so, move up to the next level.

Reasoning and Problem Solving

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